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American Journalism

by W. David Sloan
Publisher: McFarland
Release Date: 2014-01-10
Genre: Language Arts & Disciplines
Pages: 176 pages
ISBN 13: 0877882487
ISBN 10: 9780877882480
Format: PDF, ePUB, MOBI, Audiobooks, Kindle

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Synopsis : American Journalism written by W. David Sloan, published by McFarland which was released on 2014-01-10. Download American Journalism Books now! Available in PDF, EPUB, Mobi Format. criticism, likewise labeled the practice the best defense “The First Amendment is not the [press'] vital refuge—the ... See Stanley L. Harrison, “'The Wayward Press' Revisited: The Contributions of Robert Benchley,” Journalism History ... -- News consumers made cynical by sensationalist banners—“AMERICA STRIKES BACK,” “THE TERROR OF ANTHRAX”—and lurid leads might be surprised to learn that in 1690, the newspaper Publick Occurrences gossiped about the sexual indiscretions of French royalty or seasoned the story of missing children by adding that “barbarous Indians were lurking about” before the disappearance. Surprising, too, might be the media’s steady adherence to, if continual tugging at, its philosophical and ethical moorings. These 39 essays, written and edited by the nation’s leading professors of journalism, cover the theory and practice of print, radio, and TV news reporting. Politics and partisanship, press and the government, gender and the press corps, presidential coverage, war reportage, technology and news gathering, sensationalism: each subject is treated individually. Appropriate for interested lay persons, students, professors and reporters. Instructors considering this book for use in a course may request an examination copy here.

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