#Jefferson Davis And His Generals PDF

Download full Jefferson Davis And His Generals Book or read online anytime anywhere, Available in PDF, ePub and Kindle. Click Get Books and find your favorite books in the online library. Create free account to access unlimited books, fast download and ads free! We cannot guarantee that book is in the library. READ as many books as you like (Personal use).

Jefferson Davis and His Generals

by Steven E. Woodworth
Publisher:
Release Date: 1990
Genre: History
Pages: 176 pages
ISBN 13: 0877882487
ISBN 10: 9780877882480
Format: PDF, ePUB, MOBI, Audiobooks, Kindle

GET EBOOK

Synopsis : Jefferson Davis and His Generals written by Steven E. Woodworth, published by which was released on 1990. Download Jefferson Davis and His Generals Books now! Available in PDF, EPUB, Mobi Format. Argues that poor leadership in the western campaigns led to the Confederacy's defeat -- Argues that poor leadership in the western campaigns led to the Confederacy's defeat

RELATED BOOKS
Jefferson Davis and His Generals
Language: en
Pages: 380
Authors: Steven E. Woodworth, Steven E.. Woodworth
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 1990 - Publisher:

Argues that poor leadership in the western campaigns led to the Confederacy's defeat
Davis and Lee at War
Language: en
Pages: 409
Authors: Steven E. Woodworth, Steven E.. Woodworth
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 1995 - Publisher: Modern War Studies (Hardcover)

In the critically acclaimed Jefferson Davis and His Generals Steven Woodworth showed how the failures of Davis and his military leaders in the West paved the way for Confederate defeat. In Davis and Lee at War he concludes his study of Davis as rebel commander-in-chief and shows how the lack of a unified purpose and strategy in the East sealed the Confederacy's fate. Woodworth argues that Davis and Robert E. Lee, the South's greatest military leader, had sharply conflicting views over the proper conduct of the war. Davis was convinced that the South should fight a defensive war, to simply outlast the North's political and popular support for the war. By contrast, Lee and the other eastern generals - notably P.G.T. Beauregard, Gustavus Smith, and Stonewall Jackson - were eager for the offensive. They were convinced that only quick and decisive battlefield victories would prevent the North from eventually defeating them with its overwhelming advantage in men and materials. The result of this tense tug-of-war was Davis's misguided pursuit of a middle ground that gave neither strategy its best chance for success.
Jefferson Davis and His Generals
Language: en
Pages: 888
Authors: Steven E. Woodworth
Categories: Generals
Type: BOOK - Published: 1987 - Publisher:

Jefferson Davis, though apparently well-qualified for the role of commander-in-chief, nevertheless proved to be a failure in that role because of his blind devotion to certain friends, some of whom turned out to be incompetent generals, and because he lacked the ability to grasp new ideas, to handle pressure, and to make crucial decisions. This was most clearly demonstrated in the western theater of the war. Davis showed favoritism in appointing a number of his pre-war friends as generals, notably Leonidas Polk. Polk proved to be incompetent and insubordinate to his commanders, but Davis could not see this and failed to remove him. Polk's presence was made especially damaging by his efforts to undermine his immediate superior, Braxton Bragg. Bragg was a fairly competent general who, though a pre-war enemy of Davis, came to possess a moderate degree of Davis's confidence and commanded the South's chief western army for over a year. Bragg's effectiveness was reduced by Polk, who regularly disregarded orders with which he disagreed, sometimes costing the army a chance for victory. Polk also organized a movement for Bragg's removal. The morale damage caused by Polk eventually brought about the army's collapse. Davis's personal friendship with Polk kept him from preventing this. Davis's inability to trust his own judgments and to act forcefully and decisively was demonstrated in his handling of Joseph E. Johnston. Though Johnston had already caused problems in Virginia, Davis appointed the popular general to overall command in the West. Besides lacking the nerve to engage in battle, Johnston disagreed with nearly all of Davis's strategic ideas. His subsequent foot-dragging hurt the Confederate cause, especially during the Vicksburg campaign. Davis, rather than forcing compliance or removing the stubborn general, engaged in a long and petty argument with his subordinate. Despite all this Davis, in early 1864, still gave Johnston direct command of the Confederacy's only remaining major army in the West. Johnston again failed, but Davis hesitated to remove him until it was all but too late to save the vital city of Atlanta.
Jefferson Davis's Generals
Language: en
Pages: 252
Authors: Gabor S. Boritt
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2000-10-12 - Publisher: Oxford University Press

Confederate General P.G.T.Beauregard once wrote that "no people ever warred for independence with more relative advantages than the Confederates." If there was any doubt as to what Beauregard sought to imply, he later to chose to spell it out: the failure of the Confederacy lay with the Confederate president Jefferson Davis. In Jefferson Davis' Generals, a team of the nation's most distinguished Civil War historians present fascinating examinations of the men who led the Confederacy through our nation's bloodiest conflict, focusing in particular on Jefferson Davis' relationships with five key generals who held independent commands: Joseph E. Johnston, Robert E. Lee, P.G.T. Beauregard, Braxton Bragg, and John Bell Hood. Craig Symonds examines the underlying implications of a withering trust between Johnston and his friend Jefferson Davis. And was there really harmony between Davis and Robert E. Lee? A tenuous harmony at best, according to Emory Thomas. Michael Parrish explores how Beauregard and Davis worked through a deep and mutual loathing, while Steven E. Woodworth and Herman Hattaway make contrasting evaluations of the competence of Generals Braxton Bragg and John Bell Hood. Taking a different angle on Davis' ill-fated commanders, Lesley Gordon probes the private side of war through the roles of the generals' wives, and Harold Holzer investigates public perceptions of the Confederate leadership through printed images created by artists of the day. Pulitzer Prize-winner James M. McPherson's final chapter ties the individual essays together and offers a new perspective on Confederate strategy as a whole. Jefferson Davis' Generals provides stimulating new insights into one of the most vociferously debated topics in Civil War history.
Civil War Generals in Defeat
Language: en
Pages: 240
Authors: Steven E. Woodworth
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 1999 - Publisher: Modern War Studies (Hardcover)

Contains seven case studies evaluating Confederate and Union generals who might be considered "capable failures": officers of high pre-war reputation, some with distinguished records in the Civil War. Explores the various reasons these men suffered defeat such as flaws of character, errors of judgment, lack of preparation, or circumstances beyond their control. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR
Jefferson Davis and His Generals
Language: en
Pages: 794
Authors: Alfred Procter James
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 1923 - Publisher:

Books about Jefferson Davis and His Generals
Jefferson Davis
Language: en
Pages: 396
Authors: William Edward Dodd
Categories: Biography & Autobiography
Type: BOOK - Published: 1997-01-01 - Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

Every schoolchild knows that Jefferson Davis was president of the Confederacy. Most adults know little more. Who was this enigmatic man - reportedly aloof but temperamental, ravaged in health but dogged in spirit? What did he think and do as the Civil War clouds gathered and burst? This balanced biography, first published in 1907, gives focus to a character and career not well understood. From his Mississippi roots to West Point to the Mexican War to Congress to the Southern presidency and ruin - from his unique residency in the national house divided - Jefferson Davis begs better acquaintance.
No Band of Brothers
Language: en
Pages: 182
Authors: Steven E. Woodworth
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 1999 - Publisher: University of Missouri Press

The Civil War was barely over before Southerners and other students of the war began to examine the Confederate high command in search of an explanation for the South's failure. Although years of research failed to show that the South's defeat was due to a single, overriding cause, the actions of the Southern leaders during the war were certainly among the reasons the South lost the war. In No Band of Brothers, Steven Woodworth explores, through a series of essays, various facets of the way the Confederacy waged its unsuccessful war for secession. He examines Jefferson Davis and some of his more important generals, including Pierre G. T. Beauregard, Leonidas Polk, Joseph E. Johnston, Robert E. Lee, James Longstreet, and Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson; the Confederacy's strategic plans; and the South's success in making competent officers out of men with very little military preparation. Woodworth particularly looks at the personalities and personal relationships that affected the course and outcome of the war. What made a good general? What could make an otherwise able man a failure as a general? What role did personal friendships or animosities play in the Confederacy's top command assignments and decisions? How successful was the Confederacy in making competent generals out of its civilian leaders? In what ways did Jefferson Davis succeed or fail in maximizing the chances for the success of his cause? In analyzing the Confederate leadership, Woodworth reveals some weaknesses, many strengths, and much new information. No Band of Brothers will be an important addition to Civil War scholarship and will be welcomed by professional historians, amateur historians, students, and the general reader alike.
Jefferson Davis and the Civil War Era
Language: en
Pages: 144
Authors: William J. Cooper, Jr.
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-01-02 - Publisher: LSU Press

In his masterpiece, Jefferson Davis, American, William J. Cooper, Jr., crafted a sweeping, definitive biography and established himself as the foremost scholar on the intriguing Confederate president. Cooper narrows his focus considerably in Jefferson Davis and the Civil War Era, training his expert eye specifically on Davis's participation in and influence on events central to the American Civil War. Nine self-contained essays address how Davis reacted to and dealt with a variety of issues that were key to the coming of the war, the war itself, or in memorializing the war, sharply illuminating Davis's role during those turbulent years. Cooper opens with an analysis of Davis as an antebellum politician, challenging the standard view of Davis as either a dogmatic priest of principle or an inept bureaucrat. Next, he looks closely at Davis's complex association with secession, which included, surprisingly, a profound devotion to the Union. Six studies explore Davis and the Confederate experience, with topics including states' rights, the politics of command and strategic decisions, Davis in the role of war leader, the war in the West, and the meaning of the war. The final essay compares and contrasts Davis's first inauguration in Montgomery, Alabama, in 1861 with a little-known dedication of a monument to Confederate soldiers in the same city twenty-five years later. In 1886, Davis -- an old man of seventy-eight and in poor health -- had himself become a living monument, Cooper explains, and was an essential element in the formation of the Lost Cause ideology. Cooper's succinct interpretations provide straightforward, compact, and deceptively deep new approaches to understanding Davis during the most critical time in his life. Certain to stimulate further thought and spark debate, Jefferson Davis and the Civil War Era offers rare insight into one of American history's most complicated and provocative figures.
Nothing but Victory
Language: en
Pages: 800
Authors: Steven E. Woodworth
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2007-12-18 - Publisher: Vintage

Composed almost entirely of Midwesterners and molded into a lean, skilled fighting machine by Ulysses S. Grant and William Tecumseh Sherman, the Army of the Tennessee marched directly into the heart of the Confederacy and won major victories at Shiloh and at the rebel strongholds of Vicksburg and Atlanta.Acclaimed historian Steven Woodworth has produced the first full consideration of this remarkable unit that has received less prestige than the famed Army of the Potomac but was responsible for the decisive victories that turned the tide of war toward the Union. The Army of the Tennessee also shaped the fortunes and futures of both Grant and Sherman, liberating them from civilian life and catapulting them onto the national stage as their triumphs grew. A thrilling account of how a cohesive fighting force is forged by the heat of battle and how a confidence born of repeated success could lead soldiers to expect “nothing but victory.”
The American Civil War
Language: en
Pages: 754
Authors: Steven E. Woodworth, Robert Higham
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 1996 - Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

A revealing look at the Japanese through the window of their contemporary culture.
Generals in Blue and Gray: Davis's generals
Language: en
Pages: 850
Authors: Wilmer L. Jones
Categories: Command of troops
Type: BOOK - Published: 2004 - Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

Portrays the interactions of Lincoln and Davis, as commanders-in-chief, with their key generals and the resulting impact on the course of the war.