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Demographic Change and Economic Development

by Alois Wenig
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
Release Date: 2012-12-06
Genre: Political Science
Pages: 176 pages
ISBN 13: 0877882487
ISBN 10: 9780877882480
Format: PDF, ePUB, MOBI, Audiobooks, Kindle

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Synopsis : Demographic Change and Economic Development written by Alois Wenig, published by Springer Science & Business Media which was released on 2012-12-06. Download Demographic Change and Economic Development Books now! Available in PDF, EPUB, Mobi Format. This volume helps to further developments in theoretical and applied demographical economics covering the issues of demographic change and economic development. -- In recent years, population economics has become increasingly popular in both economic and policy analysis. For the inquiry into the long term development of an economy, the interaction between demographic change and economic activity cannot be neglected without omitting major aspects of the problems. This volume helps to further developments in theoretical and applied demographical economics covering the issues of demographic change and economic development. The interaction between demographic change and economic development in the long run is one central issue. One conjecture is that it is mainly the relative population pressure which controls the pace of economic development. However, econometric evidence presented in the book does not support this hypothesis. Other papers deal with the relationships between fertility and business cycle fluctuations, the timing of births, the efficiency in intergenerational transfers, the role of open economies for the population issue, historical perspectives of demographic change in Hungary and an outline of recent developments of applied modelling using input-output models, programming models or econometric techniques.

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Demographic Change and Economic Development
Language: en
Pages: 325
Authors: Alois Wenig, Klaus F. Zimmermann
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2012-12-06 - Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

In recent years, population economics has become increasingly popular in both economic and policy analysis. For the inquiry into the long term development of an economy, the interaction between demographic change and economic activity cannot be neglected without omitting major aspects of the problems. This volume helps to further developments in theoretical and applied demographical economics covering the issues of demographic change and economic development. The interaction between demographic change and economic development in the long run is one central issue. One conjecture is that it is mainly the relative population pressure which controls the pace of economic development. However, econometric evidence presented in the book does not support this hypothesis. Other papers deal with the relationships between fertility and business cycle fluctuations, the timing of births, the efficiency in intergenerational transfers, the role of open economies for the population issue, historical perspectives of demographic change in Hungary and an outline of recent developments of applied modelling using input-output models, programming models or econometric techniques.
The Demographic Dividend
Language: en
Pages: 126
Authors: David Bloom, David Canning, Jaypee Sevilla
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2003-02-13 - Publisher: Rand Corporation

There is long-standing debate on how population growth affects national economies. A new report from Population Matters examines the history of this debate and synthesizes current research on the topic. The authors, led by Harvard economist David Bloom, conclude that population age structure, more than size or growth per se, affects economic development, and that reducing high fertility can create opportunities for economic growth if the right kinds of educational, health, and labor-market policies are in place. The report also examines specific regions of the world and how their differing policy environments have affected the relationship between population change and economic development.
Population Matters
Language: en
Pages: 440
Authors: Senior Associate Nancy Birdsall, Nancy Birdsall, Allen C. Kelley, James B Duke Professor of Economics Allen C Kelley, Steven W. Sinding, Professor of Clinical Public Health Steven Sinding, Steven Sinding
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2001 - Publisher: Oxford University Press

The effect of demography on economic performance has been the subject of intense debate in economics for nearly two centuries. In recent years opinion has swung between the Malthusian views of Coale and Hoover, and the cornucopian views of Julian Simon. Unfortunately, until recently, data weretoo weak and analytical models too limited to provide clear insights into the relationship. As a result, economists as a group have not been clear or conclusive.This volume, which is based on a collection of papers that heavily rely on data from the 1980s and 1990s and on new analytical approaches, sheds important new light on demographic--economic relationships, and it provides clearer policy conclusions than any recent work on the subject. In particular,evidence from developing countries throughout the world shows a pattern in recent decades that was not evident earlier: countries with higher rates of population growth have tended to see less economic growth. An analysis of the role of demography in the "Asian economic miracle" strongly suggeststhat changes in age structures resulting from declining fertility create a one-time "demographic gift" or window of opportunity, when the working age population has relatively few dependants, of either young or old age, to support. Countries which recognize and seize on this opportunity can, as theAsian tigers did, realize healthy bursts in economic output. But such results are by no means assured: only for countries with otherwise sound economic policies will the window of opportunity yield such dramatic results. Finally, several of the studies demonstrate the likelihood of a causalrelationship between high fertility and poverty. While the direction of causality is not always clear and very likely is reciprocal (poverty contributes to high fertility and high fertility reinforces poverty), the studies support the view that lower fertility at the country level helps create apath out of poverty for many families.Population Matters represents an important further step in our understanding of the contribution of population change to economic performance. As such, it will be a useful volume for policymakers both in developing countries and in international development agencies.
Economic Growth and the Demographic Transition
Language: en
Pages: 67
Authors: David E. Bloom, David Canning, Jaypee Sevilla
Categories: Age distribition (Demography)
Type: BOOK - Published: 2001 - Publisher:

For decades, economists and social thinkers have debated the influence of population change on economic growth. Three alternative positions define this debate: that population growth restricts, promotes, or is independent of economic growth. Proponents of each explanation can find evidence to support their cases. All of these explanations, however, focus on population size and growth. In recent years, however, the debate has under-emphasized a critical issue, the age structure of the population (that is, the way in which the population is distributed across different age groups), which can change dramatically as the population grows. Because people's economic behavior varies at different stages of life, changes in a country's age structure can have significant effects on its economic performance. Nations with a high proportion of children are likely to devote a high proportion of resources to their care, which tends to depress the pace of economic growth. By contrast, if most of a nation's population falls within the working ages, the added productivity of this group can produce a 'demographic dividend' of economic growth, assuming that policies to take advantage of this are in place. In fact, the combined effect of this large working-age population and health, family, labor, financial, and human capital policies can create virtuous cycles of wealth creation. And if a large proportion of a nation's population consists of the elderly, the effects can be similar to those of a very young population. A large share of resources is needed by a relatively less productive segment of the population, which likewise can inhibit economic growth. After tracing the history of theories of the effects of population growth, this report reviews evidence on the relevance of changes in age structure for economic growth. It also examines the relationship between population change and economic development in particular regions of the world: East Asia; Japan; OECD, North America and Western Europe; South-central and Southeast Asia; Latin America; Middle East and North Africa; Sub-Saharan Africa; and Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union. Finally, it discusses the key policy variables that, combined with reduced fertility and increases in the working-age population, have contributed to economic growth in some areas of the developing world.
Population Change and Economic Development in East Asia
Language: en
Pages: 503
Authors: Andrew Mason
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2001 - Publisher: Stanford University Press

The fifteen essays in this volume address from several viewpoints the question of what role population change played in East Asia's rapid economic development.
Human Capital and Economic Growth
Language: en
Pages: 361
Authors: Alberto Bucci, Klaus Prettner, Alexia Prskawetz
Categories: Business & Economics
Type: BOOK - Published: 2019-11-26 - Publisher: Springer Nature

This edited collection explores the links between human capital (both in the form of health and in the form of education), demographic change, and economic growth. Using empirical as well as theoretical perspectives, the authors investigate several important issues in the context of human capital, namely population ageing, inequality, public policy, and long-term economic development. Ultimately, they demonstrate that the accumulation of human capital is of crucial importance to long-run economic growth.
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Pages: 512
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Categories: Business & Economics
Type: BOOK - Published: 2019-08-16 - Publisher: CRC Press

This volume presents a new perspective on demographic transition, economic growth, and national development via exploration of the Third World economies. It provides a multidimensional approach to the close relationship between the concept of the chaos and complexity theory and provides a deliberate glance into the plight of policy formulation for demographic transition, economic growth, and development of Third World countries. The volume discusses the efficiency of good strategies and practices and their impact on business growth and economic growth, depending on the depth and diversity of infrastructure sector in particular and overall socioeconomic development in general. Economic Growth and Demographic Transition in Third World Nations: A Chaos and Complexity Theory Perspective covers a conglomeration of various aspects and issues related to the effect of demographic transition on socio-economic development in Third World countries, especially in the post-globalized era. It focuses on the applicability of the chaos and complexity theory in order to elicit transformational policies and aims to discuss and predict future projections of the new world of the economic growth policies.
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Language: en
Pages: 368
Authors: Matteo Cervellati, Uwe Sunde
Categories: Business & Economics
Type: BOOK - Published: 2017-10-20 - Publisher: MIT Press

Recent approaches to economic demography, investigating the effect of the transition to low mortality and low fertility on economic development. Over the last two hundred years, mortality and fertility levels in the Western world have dropped to unprecedented levels. This demographic transition was accompanied by an economic transition that led to widespread education and economic growth after centuries of near-stagnation. At the same time, other changes have occurred in family structures, culture, and the organization of society. Economists have only recently begun to take into account the demographic transition from high mortality and high fertility when modeling and researching economic development. This CESifo volume reviews recent approaches to economic demography, considering such topics as the bio-geographic origins of comparative development differences, the role of health improvements and mortality decline, as well as physiological, familial, cultural, and social aspects. After an overview of the study of demography and economic demography, the chapters cover subjects including the Neolithic era and the period of the formation of states and social institutions; longevity and economic growth; household decision making and fertility; land inequality, education, and marriage in nineteenth century Prussia; and caste systems and technology in pre-modern societies. The book concludes with a call for further investigation of the institutional and social factors that influence demographics and economies, suggesting that unified growth theory offers a potential approach to studying development. Contributors Matteo Cervellati, Francesco Cinnirella, David de la Croix, Carl-Johann Dalgaard, Matthias Doepke, Elena Esposito, Davide Fiaschi, Tamara Fioroni, Oded Galor, Boris Gershman, Erik Hornung, Fabian Kindermann, Nils-Petter Lagerlöf, Holger Strulik, Uwe Sunde, David N. Weil
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Language: en
Pages: 457
Authors: Roger Mark Selya
Categories: History
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Demographic Change and Economic Growth
Language: en
Pages: 270
Authors: Lars Weber
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2010-08-02 - Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

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Demographic Change and Levels of Living
Language: en
Pages: 157
Authors: Rathindra P. Sen
Categories: Cost and standard of living
Type: BOOK - Published: 1989 - Publisher: Daya Books

Economic development has to be ultimately assessed by the enhancement of the freedom that people enjoy. Freedom does not always mean political independence but also the socio-economic dimensions that people perceive. The book is concerned with the magnitude of economic freedom of one-seventh of the world s population i e, the poverty-ridden people of India. After 41 years of Independence, India today stands on the threshold of a mighty economic transformation. Profound break-through is noticeable in all walks of socio-economic life; yet 37 percent of its population is still lying below the poverty line. Excessive population growth frustrates economic development and living standards in India. Demographically its Net Reproduction Rate is 1.51 and its population is increasing by 16 million every year and is likely to overtake China for the dubious honour of the world s most populous nation by the year 2020 A D. Although more than 76 million births have been averted since Independence, yet the crux of the problem of stabilization of population growth in India is to bring down birth to the level of death rate to achieve zero growth rate of population. Contents Chapter 1: Demographic Threat and International Security; Chapter 2: Variation in Age Structure; Chapter 3: Incomes and Living Standards; Chapter 4: Investment in Man; Chapter 5: Food Prospects and Population Burden; Chapter 6: Passage to Industrialization; Chapter 7: Destiny of Urban Civilization; Chapter 8: Planning for Growing Population: Choices for India.
Population Change and Economic Growth in Africa
Language: en
Pages: 8
Authors: Rathindra P. Sen
Categories: Africa
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013 - Publisher:

In June 2013, the United Nations (UN) released its latest set of biennial population projections, World Population Prospects. One of the most striking changes comes from Africa, where fertility estimates for many countries have been revised substantially upwards. Apart from increasing the total number of people who must be supported on a limited resource base, high fertility has a strong distorting effect on population age structure. High-fertility populations are dominated by large numbers of dependent children, leaving few resources to boost current consumption or to save and invest for the future. In this situation, rapid fertility decline can lead to an immediate acceleration of economic growth, which has been termed the "first demographic dividend." Investment of the resources gained from this demographic jump-start can usher in a "second demographic dividend," providing the basis for sustained economic development. What does the future hold for Africa? In order to achieve a robust demographic dividend, policymakers in Africa's high-fertility countries need to focus first and foremost on fertility decline. The second policy priority is to increase investment in the health and education of children. All over the world, per capita investment in children has tended to increase as fertility goes down. It is important that African countries follow this path, both to assure the wellbeing of children today and to boost the productivity of the workforce tomorrow. Investments in children do not achieve a maximum economic impact, however, unless they are accompanied by a robust job market. If young adults can find productive employment, they will be able to enjoy higher consumption, invest in their own children, and set money aside for the future. In exploring alternatives for economic development, policymakers need to emphasize job growth for young workers. Finally, governments need to create an economic environment that helps working-age populations save and invest. Well-functioning financial markets, a strong banking system, secure property rights, a competitive economy, and financial literacy all play a role in assuring the economic security of all age groups.