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The Cambridge Handbook of Consciousness

by Philip David Zelazo
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Release Date: 2007-05-14
Genre: Psychology
Pages: 176 pages
ISBN 13: 0877882487
ISBN 10: 9780877882480
Format: PDF, ePUB, MOBI, Audiobooks, Kindle

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Synopsis : The Cambridge Handbook of Consciousness written by Philip David Zelazo, published by Cambridge University Press which was released on 2007-05-14. Download The Cambridge Handbook of Consciousness Books now! Available in PDF, EPUB, Mobi Format. being invaded by non-social information, the non-social world becomes available for reflexive consciousness to explore” (p. 190). In other words, people are able to represent their thoughts and actions to themselves (or ... -- The Cambridge Handbook of Consciousness is the first of its kind in the field, and its appearance marks a unique time in the history of intellectual inquiry on the topic. After decades during which consciousness was considered beyond the scope of legitimate scientific investigation, consciousness re-emerged as a popular focus of research towards the end of the last century, and it has remained so for nearly 20 years. There are now so many different lines of investigation on consciousness that the time has come when the field may finally benefit from a book that pulls them together and, by juxtaposing them, provides a comprehensive survey of this exciting field. An authoritative desk reference, which will also be suitable as an advanced textbook.

RELATED BOOKS
The Cambridge Handbook of Consciousness
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Philip David Zelazo, Morris Moscovitch, Evan Thompson
Categories: Psychology
Type: BOOK - Published: 2007-05-14 - Publisher: Cambridge University Press

The Cambridge Handbook of Consciousness is the first of its kind in the field, and its appearance marks a unique time in the history of intellectual inquiry on the topic. After decades during which consciousness was considered beyond the scope of legitimate scientific investigation, consciousness re-emerged as a popular focus of research towards the end of the last century, and it has remained so for nearly 20 years. There are now so many different lines of investigation on consciousness that the time has come when the field may finally benefit from a book that pulls them together and, by juxtaposing them, provides a comprehensive survey of this exciting field. An authoritative desk reference, which will also be suitable as an advanced textbook.
Evolution, Culture, and Consciousness
Language: en
Pages: 310
Authors: Thomas Edward McNamara
Categories: Psychology
Type: BOOK - Published: 2004 - Publisher: University Press of America

Thomas McNamara, in Evolution, Culture, and Consciousness, presents the first comprehensive theory of human perception and consciousness based on the generally accepted principles of evolutionary psychology. This theory, building on the best evolutionary research, explains that just a few simple neurological changes in the primate brain account for human speech, self-consciousness and the creation of meaning out of experience. All primates can learn, but our species evolved a new instinct for learning, which makes childhood learning just as powerful as the other biological instincts found in all other primates. McNamara shows that children are genetically programmed to learn not just what to think, but how to think, shaping the preconscious process for creating meaning out of experience. However, because our environment has changed radically since our origin, this archaic form of consciousness has become a major block to human development and success. After explaining how we have all been programmed to preconsciously create meaning out of experience, McNamara shows how we can create a new and more successful way of thinking and feeling, resulting in a happier, more productive, stress free life.
The Figure of Consciousness
Language: en
Pages: 268
Authors: Jill M. Kress
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2002 - Publisher: Psychology Press

This work, through analysis of metaphors of conciousness, traces the significance of representations of knowledge, gender and social class, revealing how writers conceived of the self in modern literature.
Pirandello and the Crisis of Modern Consciousness
Language: en
Pages: 172
Authors: Anthony Francis Caputi
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 1988 - Publisher: University of Illinois Press

Books about Pirandello and the Crisis of Modern Consciousness
Being as Consciousness
Language: en
Pages: 270
Authors: Fernando Tola, Carmen Dragonetti
Categories: Buddhist philosophy
Type: BOOK - Published: 2004 - Publisher: Motilal Banarsidass Publ.

This work is intended to the study of the Yogacara Buddhist philosop[hy together with its commentaries and notes for better comprehensibility of the contents of three edited and translated texts, namely, Alambanapariksavrtti of Dignaga; the vimsatika Vijnaptimatratasiddhih of Vasubandhu and Trisvabhavakarika of Vasubandhu.
Consciousness, Color, and Content
Language: en
Pages: 198
Authors: Michael Tye
Categories: Philosophy
Type: BOOK - Published: 2002 - Publisher: MIT Press

A further development of Tye's theory of phenomenal consciousness along with replies to common objections.
Questioning Consciousness
Language: en
Pages: 260
Authors: Ralph D. Ellis
Categories: Psychology
Type: BOOK - Published: 1995-01-01 - Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing

"Questioning Consciousness" brings together neuroscientific, psychological and phenomenological research, combining in a readable format recent developments in image research and neurology. It reassesses the mind-body relation and research on 'mental models', abstract concept formation, and acquisition of logical and apparently 'imageless' inference skills. It is argued that to be conscious of an object is essentially to imagine in a habituated way what would happen if we were to perform certain actions in relation to the object; and that mental images fit together to build up abstract concepts. This analysis shows why conscious information processing is so structurally different from yet interrelated with non-conscious processing, and how mind and body interrelate as a process to its substratum in the way that a sound wave relates to the medium through which it passes. (Series A)
Crisis-consciousness and the Novel
Language: en
Pages: 269
Authors: Eugene Hollahan
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 1992 - Publisher: University of Delaware Press

"This book examines the emergence of modern consciousness as consciousness develops historically in one cultural form: prose fiction narrative. The book represents a critical history of crisis, arguably the most characterizing single word in the modern world and a major figuration or trope. Eugene Hollahan has studied the history of this important word within the development of the English-language novel, from Samuel Richardson to Saul Bellow. After establishing a heuristic model for such a critical history, Hollahan tracks the word (characterized by George Eliot in Felix Holt, the Radical as a "great noun") through two-and-a-half centuries of narratives by major novelists, with contextualizing excursions into discourses in related fields such as autobiography, philosophy, theology, and social science." "Hollahan contextualizes his study of English-language narrative fiction by examining the writings of crisis-rhetoricians in the eighteenth century (Thomas Paine), nineteenth century (Thomas Carlyle, J. S. Mill, and J. H. Newman), and twentieth century (Karl Barth, Edmund Husserl, T. S. Kuhn, and Richard M. Nixon). Such varied and powerful crisis-rhetorics establish a matrix of language and ideas for the crisis-centered novels Hollahan surveys. These novels include major works by Samuel Richardson, Walter Scott, Jane Austen, George Eliot, George Meredith, George Gissing, George Moore, D. H. Lawrence, E. M. Forster, James Joyce, Lawrence Durrell, Robert Coover, and Saul Bellow." "Hollahan's description of the crisis-trope interfaces with various critical issues such as canonical inclusion, reader response, and deconstruction. On the whole, his book acknowledges current critical issues but endeavors to remain basically a critical history. It attempts to demonstrate that the crisis-riddled modern world and the crisis-conscious novel are analogous and coeval." "Crisis begins as Aristotle's term for logical plot structuring, becomes Longinus's term for emotional exacerbation, and eventually enters into a variety of critical and narrative formulations: Matthew Arnold's cultural centrality, Henry James's existential aestheticism, Lawrence's self-defining sexuality, Marshall Brown's revolutionary turning point, Paul de Man's error-ridden criticism, Floyd Merrell's cut into the primordial flux, Durrell's reborn self, and Bellow's analysis of hysterical escapism. Broadly speaking, Hollahan argues that any crisis-trope will enable or even necessitate a unique confluence of writerly and readerly skills." "In Louis Lambert, Balzac urged: "What a wonderful book one would write by narrating the life and adventures of a word." The story Hollahan narrates fulfills Balzac's expectations as it depicts writer after writer working out influential representations of human life in terms of crisis-consciousness centering upon George Eliot's "great noun" crisis. Historically, Hollahan demonstrates, such consciousness comes to define modern humanity."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved
Subjective Consciousness
Language: en
Pages: 333
Authors: Uriah Kriegel, Professor of Philosophy and Cognitive Science and Associate Director of the Center for Consciousness Studies Uriah Kriegel
Categories: Philosophy
Type: BOOK - Published: 2009-08-06 - Publisher: Oxford University Press

Some mental events are conscious, some are unconscious. What is the difference between the two? Uriah Kriegel offers an answer. His aim is a comprehensive theory of the features that all and only conscious mental events have. The key idea is that consciousness arises when self-awareness andworld-awareness are integrated in the right way. Conscious mental events differ from unconscious ones in that, whatever else they may represent, they always also represent themselves, and do so in a very specific way. Subjective Consciousness is a fascinating new move forward towards a fullunderstanding of the mind.
Light of Consciousness
Language: en
Pages: 134
Authors: Martin Odudukudu
Categories: Philosophy
Type: BOOK - Published: 2011-07-21 - Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

Summary Light of Consciousness Metaphysics is a controversial subject because its concepts are not the same as and do not follow the same process of thinking as in other subjects. to think metaphysically, one must thinks out of the box; one must think independently of object and objective experiences, and this has to be learned. In metaphysics, one separates experiences due to objects from experiences occurring independently of objects. Such thinking is unusual, different from everyday thinking processes. Otherwise, one does not, for example, separate characterization one ascribes to God (or absolute intelligence) from ground of such characterization. Empiricists often insist that there is no such thing as an experience independent of an object; yet they do not explain the objects if any that one perceives, conceive and represents as corresponding to experiences of time, space, self consciousness, and so on. In Critic of Pure Reason, Kant (1781-1787) sees nature as subject to necessary law. These laws, Kant would say are accessible to us because cognition of these laws depends on the subject of thinking who characterizes its perceptions of nature according to rules. Thinking and characterizing; the problem that arises from this way of framing subjective and objective relationship is answering the question, what and how must the subject be in order to operate as a part of or apart from nature and still be said to determine it? Kant's answer to this dilemma is to split nature into sensuous (objects) and intelligible (things as they are in themselves) realm; however, he does not explain how the intelligible connects with the objective realm independent of thinking; that is, how one, an object, can determines an object. In view of these problems, Light of Consciousness is intended to achieve two main goals; (1) in chapterone, we attempt to point out the cognition with its elements in virtue of which Metaphysics may also ascend its throne as a legitimate subject matter. Here, just as cognition of external object is cognition of objective relations or physics, the object of cognition in metaphysics consist of objects of inner sense of which a subject of inner sense has been repeatedly identified as the aspect of inner sense saddled with the task of thinking, and therefore not objective. However, the controversy in Metaphysics is that a subject of inner sense is objective or empirical; therefore, to say that without experience there is no self. Light of Consciousness is intended to address these problem not by merely laying claims to its existence, but also by pointing out its instances of and in occurrence. In the other chapters of the book, we seek to point out some of the important topics of metaphysics, and to show how these topics help to further simply the subject matter. We describe these various aspects of the subject matter of metaphysics and their various elements and how these relate to self. We attempt to show that the operation of standing away from thinking is a real activity unique to the human being. In the chapter of time and space, we attempt to explicate its constituents as they relate to self. In the chapter on Monad, we went further to establish the natures of primary elements of nature, by explicating a process of development of pure and objective consciousness and their processes. Finally, in the chapters on consciousness and thought, we attempt to describe and explicate elements, constitution and process of operations of pure and objective consciousness. Here, we explain what consciousness is, what it consists of. Most important, we attempt to identify the nature of a consciousness in virtue of which one determine a representation of time and space, and to differentiate this from a consciousness in virtue of which one determines and represents an object in time and space.
Phenomenal Consciousness
Language: en
Pages: 256
Authors: Dimitris Platchias
Categories: Philosophy
Type: BOOK - Published: 2014-12-05 - Publisher: Routledge

How can the fine-grained phenomenology of conscious experience arise from neural processes in the brain? How does a set of action potentials (nerve impulses) become like the feeling of pain in one's experience? Contemporary neuroscience is teaching us that our mental states correlate with neural processes in the brain. However, although we know that experience arises from a physical basis, we don't have a good explanation of why and how it so arises. The problem of how physical processes give rise to experience is called the 'hard problem' of consciousness and it is the contemporary manifestation of the mind-body problem. This book explains the key concepts that surround the issue as well as the nature of the hard problem and the several approaches to it. It gives a comprehensive treatment of the phenomenon incorporating its main metaphysical and epistemic aspects, as well as recent empirical findings, such as the phenomenon of blindsight, change blindness, visual-form agnosia and optic ataraxia, mirror recognition in other primates, split-brain cases and synaesthesia.
The Natural Problem of Consciousness
Language: en
Pages: 257
Authors: Pietro Snider
Categories: Philosophy
Type: BOOK - Published: 2017-06-12 - Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

The “Natural Problem of Consciousness” is the problem of understanding why there are presently conscious beings at all. Given a non-reductive naturalist framework taking consciousness as an ontologically subjective biological phenomenon, how can we rationally explain the fact that the actual world has turned out to be one where there are presently living beings that can feel, rather than having developed as a zombie-world in which there would be no conscious experiences of any kind? This book introduces the Natural Problem by relating it to central problems in the philosophy of mind (metaphysical mind-body problem, Hard Problem of consciousness) and emphasizing the distinctive interest of its diachronic dimension. Ranging from philosophy to biology and neuroscience, it offers a thorough analysis aimed at better understanding what could explain why phenomenal consciousness has been preserved throughout evolution by natural selection. This is an original, engaging, and thought provoking philosophical study of a neglected but fundamental question regarding the nature and origin of consciousness.